congressmanbillposeyWashington, May 16 – WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Bill Posey (R-Rockledge) released the following statement regarding today’s vote on legislation he cosponsored which fully repeals the Obamacare law:

“The Administration is carrying out a dangerous experiment on our families, our businesses and the overall economy,” said Posey. “The problem with passing a massive, complicated bill like Obamacare is that it’s almost impossible to understand, let alone implement – a ‘train wreck’ according to the lead author of the Administration’s bill in the Senate. It took me four days to read the House version of the Health Care bill, which essentially empowers unelected bureaucrats to fill in the law’s rules and details. 

“The main reasons then Speaker Pelosi gave for passing health care was to make insurance affordable, improve care and cover the uninsured. Three years later, the bill is twice the costly, insurance premiums are up over $3,000 per family, and in January when the bill kicks-in more fully, 30 million Americans will still be without health insurance. All of this is stifling the economy with expensive mandates and driving median family income down by over $4,000 in just the last 4 years. Health insurance is even more expensive and you have less money in your pocket to pay for it.

“Do you still remember the major promise that: ‘if you like your health plan you can keep it?’ Millions of Americans have already lost their plan, and been forced to more expensive alternatives. And, while I’ve never been a fan of giving the IRS more power, turning health care enforcement over the IRS in light of the recent scandals is even more of a bad idea.

“I strongly supported the House vote to repeal this law – for the third time – and the Senate should follow suit. There were 82 new Members of Congress who had never voted on repeal. Now, they are fully accountable for their position on the upcoming ‘train wreck.’ There are several simpler health care reforms that could probably pass Congress tomorrow with bipartisan support, including addressing pre-existing conditions and ensuring that health insurers pay for necessary care.

“Unfortunately, we are here today because the Administration was unwilling to start with areas of agreement, choosing instead ram through the most controversial changes to health care and rewriting not only the relationship between the citizen and the federal government, but also the relationship between a patient and their physician.”

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