A picture taken Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013 and showing the building which hosts the Vatican bank, formerly known as the Institute for Religious Works, IOR, inside the Vatican. Italian police say two men toting a briefcase stuffed with false bond certificates with a purported worth of trillions of euros (dollars) tried to bluff their way into the Vatican's exclusive bank in a foiled fraud plot. Financial Guard police Lt. Col. Davide Cardia said the would-be swindlers tried to convince Swiss Guards and other security personnel at a Vatican City gate a week ago that "cardinals were expecting them." Cardia told The Associated Press by telephone Sunday, March 30, 2014, that the men, a middle-aged Dutchman and a U.S. citizen, were detained after checks by Vatican officials found they had no such appointments at the bank, which isn't open to the public. A 2010 money-laundering probe by Rome prosecutors sparked tougher scrutiny at the bank. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
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A picture taken Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013 and showing the building which hosts the Vatican bank, formerly known as the Institute for Religious Works, IOR, inside the Vatican. Italian police say two men toting a briefcase stuffed with false bond certificates with a purported worth of trillions of euros (dollars) tried to bluff their way into the Vatican’s exclusive bank in a foiled fraud plot. Financial Guard police Lt. Col. Davide Cardia said the would-be swindlers tried to convince Swiss Guards and other security personnel at a Vatican City gate a week ago that “cardinals were expecting them.” Cardia told The Associated Press by telephone Sunday, March 30, 2014, that the men, a middle-aged Dutchman and a U.S. citizen, were detained after checks by Vatican officials found they had no such appointments at the bank, which isn’t open to the public. A 2010 money-laundering probe by Rome prosecutors sparked tougher scrutiny at the bank. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

ROME (AP) — Two men toting a briefcase stuffed with false bond certificates purportedly worth trillions of euros (dollars) tried to bluff their way into the exclusive Vatican bank in a foiled fraud plot, Italian police said Sunday.

Financial Guard police Lt. Col. Davide Cardia said the would-be swindlers, who were wearing business suits, tried to convince Swiss Guards at a Vatican City gate earlier this month that “cardinals were expecting them.”

Cardia told The Associated Press in a phone interview that the suspects, a middle-aged Dutchman and a U.S. citizen, were detained by Vatican authorities after rapid checks by Vatican officials showed they had no such appointment nor connections with the Institute for Religious Works, the formal name of the bank, which is behind the tiny city-state’s walls and isn’t open to the public.

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