Giving up tobacco is one of the best decisions you could ever make. But trying to quit smoking with the help of a drug is one of the worst — especially if that drug is Chantix. 

I’m sure you’ve seen the headlines and heard about the lawsuits over Pfizer’s anti-smoking drug. It’s been shown to dramatically increase the risk of depression, including serious depression, and it’s also been associated with bizarre behavior, violence, and even suicide.

But Pfizer is trying to make you forget all that with a company-funded study that supposedly “proves” the drug is not only safe, but is even safe for people who are already depressed.

In the study, 525 people were given either the drug or a placebo. I’ve seen it spun as a yearlong study, but while the patients were tracked for a year, the treatment itself lasted just 12 weeks.

And sure, over the course of the study period, there was no increase in suicide “scores.” But that only means none of the patients showed an increased interest in attempting suicide.

The problem here is that many of the reports of people who’ve killed themselves while taking this drug claim there have been no warning signs at all — so suicide scores wouldn’t have helped identify them anyway.

The study also excluded depressed people who already had some of the warning signs of suicide — which means they may have left out some of the very people who could face the highest risks of all.

And yet they’ve still managed to claim the drug is safe for “depressed people.”

So forget this study and look at the unbiased research on this drug — like the study last year that found people who took Chantix increased their risk of severe depression and suicide by 8 times.

Another study even found that Chantix users are 18 times more likely to be involved in violence than people who take other meds.

The most effective approach is to go cold turkey — but if you need a little help along the way, speak to a holistic doctor about natural remedies and consider trying acupuncture.