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Story at-a-glance

  • One in 10 American children now has attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—a 22 percent increase from 2003. Boys are twice more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than girls
  • ADHD involves a cluster of symptoms that include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behaviors. Often, children with ADHD struggle in school and have difficulty managing interpersonal relationships
  • The cause of ADHD remains elusive, although there are many contending culprits, including poor nutrition and environmental toxins ranging from food and vaccine additives to agricultural chemicals
  • Five dietary factors that tend to have a detrimental effect on ADHD and behavior in general are reviewed. Optimizing your child’s gut flora is also crucial. A key step is to avoid processed foods
  • Glyphosate-contaminated food has recently been implicated in the dramatic rise of ADHD and autism. Both problems tend to involve abnormal gut flora, and this is where glyphosate begins its path of destruction

December 05, 2013 | 116,448 views

By Dr. Mercola

According to a 2010 US government survey,1 1 in 10 American children now has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—a 22 percent increase from 2003.

ADHD makes it hard for children to pay attention and control impulsive behavior, and an increasing number of older children, including high school students, are now being labeled as having ADHD. Adult ADHD is also becoming more prevalent.

As reported by the Las Vegas Guardian Express,2 nearly 11 percent of American kids are labeled with the disorder. More than twice as many boys are diagnosed with ADHD than girls—one in five, compared to one in 11. The featured article speculates about the cause behind these rising numbers.

Some experts feel the increase could be due to increased awareness and better diagnosis, but I think you’ll find it interesting that this trend also coincides with increased prevalence of the pervasive weed killer, glyphosate, in the American food supply.

There’s also plenty of room for overdiagnosis. In fact, an ADHD diagnosis is often made on the subjective observations of teachers or guardians, based on signs that nearly every child will display at some point. Aggravating factors, such as diet or home environment, are oftentimes overlooked entirely.

The featured article actually points out some interesting correlations between ADHD diagnoses and changes to the American educational system that might help explain how, if not why, so many children are misdiagnosed or flat out falsely diagnosed.

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