ActivistPost
InformationClearingHouse

Ecuador Fails To Keep Promise Allowing Assange Partial Internet Access

By Aaron Kesel

Ecuador claims it will partially restore the WikiLeaks founder’s communications with the outside world from its London embassy, according to reports. Julian Assange has been living in the embassy for more than six years, having been prevented most recently from using communications services during seven months of isolation.

WikiLeaks
@wikileaks

Ecuador rolls back @JulianAssange isolation after UN meets with president

Background: https://justice4assange.comhttp://www.itv.com/news/2018-10-14/julian-assanges-communications-partly-restored-by-ecuadorian-government/ 

Reports are claiming that Assange’s communication ban will be partially lifted after a meeting between UN officials and Ecuadorian President Lenín Moreno on Friday.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi and UN Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression David Kaye met with President Moreno and agreed to partially alleviate the ban on communications, Express.co.uk reported.

However, Ecuador has failed to keep to its promises thus far and even prevented a legal advisor from entering the building, according to an update on WikiLeaks’ Twitter.

WikiLeaks
@wikileaks

Although Ecuador has stated that Mr. Assange’s isolation will be partly lifted today (after UN Special Rapportuers for Freedom of Expression & Refugees visited the country on Friday) it has yet to do so. A 2pm appointment today, with a legal advisor, was not let into the embassy.

After this article went to press, the conditions Assange would have to abide by to receive his human rights back were leaked online in Spanish.

The Gateway Pundit translated the shocking draconian document limiting Assange’s rights within asylum.

“The document demands that he avoids any activities that could be political or would interfere in interior matters of other states — essentially squashing his freedom of speech and his ability to publish.

The document begins by outlining the new rules for visitors. It says that any person outside the Embassy or the ecuadorian Government, without exception, that wishes to visit Assange will need to request prior authorization in writing addressed to the Chief of the Embassy of Ecuador. They will need to include their full names, nationality, copies of identification, reason for the visit, their profession and workplace, email accounts and links to their social media, and serial numbers (IMEI) for any phones or tablets they wish to keep with them during the visit,” The Gateway Pundit reported.

Perhaps more notably, once Assange’s Internet is restored he will be liable for any costs accumulated using WiFi and medical expenses.

The document also states that Assange can only use his own devices that are registered with Ecuador’s embassy except in extraordinary cases and only with written permission from Ecuador.

Assange must provide the brand name, model number, and serial number for any devices he currently has in the embassy.

This suggests that there is intense surveillance taking place of Assange’s IoT (Internet of Things) devices and potentially the use of exploits like those security vulnerabilities revealed in Vault 7.

If that’s not enough, unsurprisingly there are also limits being placed on Assange’s freedom of speech.

The document states while Assange is “exercising his right of communication and of freedom of expression,” he is prohibited from activities that could be considered political or interfering in the affairs of other nations or that may damage the relationship between Ecuador and other states.

It’s a rule that Ecuador says, if broken, can lead to the revoking of Assange’s asylum or right to put him back into solitary confinement and isolation without a single charge.

The Wikileaks founder has been arbitrarily detained, according to the UN, for nearly 6 years in the Ecuadorian embassy.

In March, Ecuador and its leader Lenín Moreno pulled the plug on Julian Assange’s Internet connection. Then, Ecuador further demanded Assange remove a specific tweet referencing a foreign political prisoner Carles Puigdemont. The irony here is that Ecuador accused Assange of “interfering in a state” for mentioning another political prisoner and Assange himself had more of his own rights taken away.

“In 1940 the elected president of Catalonia, Lluís Companys, was captured by the Gestapo, at the request of Spain, delivered to them and executed. Today, German police have arrested the elected president of Catalonia, Carles Puigdemont, at the request of Spain, to be extradited,” Assange tweeted.

Ecuador clarified its position on Julian Assange’s asylum at the time by drafting new rules limiting his communications according to WikiLeaks.

[READ: Ecuadorian Embassy Adds New Rules For Julian Assange — No Visitors, Phone Calls Or Internet]

The original cut-off of Assange’s Internet was due to an alleged breach of an agreement to refrain from interfering in other states’ affairs.

The action, according to Ecuador, was taken following Assange’s breach of a written agreement signed with the Ecuadorian government at the end of 2017, in which he vowed “not to send messages interfering in the affairs of other sovereign states,” the government said in a statement. “The Executive remains open to the possibility of further sanctions in cases of future breaches of the agreements by Assange.”

WikiLeaks has previously stated that Assange was never under a gag agreement, calling the allegations “entirely false.”

WikiLeaks believes that the fact their editor is being censored for what Ecuador is stating is “interfering in a state” is a huge step in the direction of “setting a precedent that would outlaw millions of Twitter users, all journalists and more human rights workers.”

On Sunday, the Press Association reported the Ecuadorian government had partially restored Assange’s access to the Internet, mobile phones, as well as visits at the embassy, which have also been restricted to everyone but members of Assange’s legal team.

WikiLeaks said in a statement:

Ecuador has told WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange that it will remove the isolation regime imposed on him following meetings between two senior UN officials and Ecuador’s president, Lenin Moreno, on Friday.

Kristinn Hrafnsson, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief, added: “It is positive that through UN intervention Ecuador has partly ended the isolation of Mr. Assange although it is of grave concern that his freedom to express his opinions is still limited.

The UN has already declared Mr Assange a victim of arbitrary detention. This unacceptable situation must end. The UK government must abide by the UN’s ruling and guarantee that he can leave the Ecuadorian embassy without the threat of extradition to the United States.

However, with some of his rights back Assange is not safe and is still facing a threat of extradition, which the war is on to stop as Activist Post previously reported.

WikiLeaks has recently faced increased pressure from authorities. Last year, the U.S. Senate considered a bill that would classify WikiLeaks as a “non-state hostile intelligence service” bundled as part of the 2018 Intelligence Authorization Act. Presumably, that classification would authorize the use of force against WikiLeaks and presumably its supporters.

Then in late December of last year the Head Legal Office in Madrid of former judge and WikiLeaks’ chief counsel, Baltasar Garzón was raided by masked men dressed in all black and the security cameras were taped. Despite the break-in, nothing was taken and the operation was referred to as being “professionally done” by police.

The WikiLeaks founder has been in refuge since 2012.

Here Are the Demands Ecuador Has Given Julian Assange in Order to End His Isolation

By Cassandra Fairbanks

October 15, 2018 Information Clearing House Despite numerous reports claiming that the communications of Julian Assange have been restored, they are not yet — and there will be a severe regime of penalties and sanctions on his speech and writing when they are.

The team at WikiLeaks was informed on Friday that his communications would be restored on Monday, October 15, but so far there has not been any change. In a grave violation of free speech, Assange was also presented with a nine page document that includes outlining limitations and restrictions on what he will be able to do and say online.

The new rules also promise to potentially use the UK police against visitors or to sieze communications equipment.

The protocols Assange will be forced to agree to in order to end his isolation have been leaked online in Spanish

The draconian document demands that he avoids any activities that could be political or would interfere in interior matters of other states — essentially squashing his freedom of speech and his ability to publish.

It also provides new rules for visitors.

VISITORS

The document begins by outlining the new rules for visitors. It says that any person outside the Embassy or the ecuadorian Government, without exception, that wishes to visit Assange will need to request prior authorization in writing addressed to the Chief of the Embassy of Ecuador. They will need to include their full names, nationality, copies of identification, reason for the visit, their profession and workplace, email accounts and links to their social media, and serial numbers for any phones or tablets they wish to keep with them during the visit.

Additionally, the IMEI of visitor’s cellphone chips is also required for their intelligence collection operation. This must be sent through email, a return email obtained, and that must be printed and brought to the appointment.

For frequent visitors, Ecuador is willing to make exceptions and give them a letter of identification which they will only have to renew every three months.

Should the embassy refuse to allow someone access, they will not be providing a reason why. It says that they reserve the right to decline or cancel any authorization at any time, even for those who have been previously authorized as a frequent visitor.

When this reporter visited Assange in the days prior to his isolation, all details were worked out with staff working for Assange. The embassy simply checked my passport and held my phone at the front desk.

The new protocol also asserts that the embassy will be keeping a record of all visits made to Assange and the data that they provide. This information will be sent to the Ecuadorian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and other unnamed agencies.

Assange will also only be allowed to have up to three visitors at once, unless cleared by the head of the embassy.

Ecuador also wrote that people who violate the rules of their visits or display a lack of “appropriate behavior” during the visit will be reported to British authorities.

COMMUNICATIONS

The section regarding Assange’s communications begins by saying that when his internet is restored he will be liable for any costs for WiFi. It says that he may only use his own tablets, phones or computers except in exceptional cases and only with written permission from Ecuador.

Assange must also provide the brand name, model number, and serial number for any devices he has in the embassy.

While the document asserts that Ecuador shall not be liable for the contents of his communications, statements, documents or messages on social media — it goes on to place severe limits on his freedom of speech.

It says that Assange, while “exercising his right of communication and of freedom of expression,” is prohibited from activities that could be considered political or interfering in the affairs of other nations or that may damage the relationship between Ecuador and other states.

Ecuador says that disobeying this rule can lead to termination of asylum or placing him back into isolation.

Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno has previously stated that speech restrictions include opinions critical of US or Spanish policies — such as criticism of Spanish police brutalizing peaceful voters.

MEDICAL

The document says that Assange must submit to the quarterly evaluations with medical specialists at his own expense.

The results of any examinations will be kept private.

“In case of a medical emergency or at the express request of mr. Assange, the Head of the Mission will authorize your transfer, as soon as possible, to receive care from physicians outside the Embassy,” the document says.

The UK has repeatedly denied Assange safe passage to a hospital after doctors who examined him called for himto be allowed to go and be treated for his deteriorating health. If he was to be transported to a hospital, it is extremely likely he would be arrested.

Additionally, Ecuador is threatening to kidnap Assange’s embassy cat and bring him to an animal shelter if they deem it is not being properly cleaned up after.

On March 28, Ecuador caved to pressure from the United States and Spanish governments to isolate Assange by revoking his right to have visitors, make phone calls or use the internet.

The WikiLeaks founder entered the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on June 19, 2012. He was soon granted political aslyum.

The UK has long refused to acknowledge the findings of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (UNWGAD), which found that Assange is being arbitrarily and unlawfully detained and must be immediately released and compensated.

This article was originally published by The Gateway Pundit