ActivistPost

Five Thousand Inventions in Limbo and Under “Secrecy Orders” at the US Patent Office

By Jon Rappaport

In light of the resurgence in the news this past week regarding President Trump’s announcement of a proposed ‘Space Force’, as a new, sixth branch of the military (see here and here), I’m re-posting my article on secret patents… For many individuals, the notion of being in outer-space on various missions, brings their imaginations and energy to the fore, in tremendous ways — as in, The Flood. And, when that happens, then things start to happen — for the betterment of all of us. President Trump is reminding us of the imagination and energy inside each of us — and that, in-and-of-itself, is a gesture that should never be underestimated. With that said, what are some of the technologies needed for various successfully-conducted space missions? And, how many of those technologies are currently being withheld from the public in secret?


How many of these 5,000-plus patents, if granted, would be game changers for planet Earth? Who knows?

Buckle up. Here we go.

From FAS (Federation of American Scientists), Secrecy News, Oct. 21, 2010, “Invention Secrecy Still Going Strong,” by Steven Aftergood:

“There were 5,135 inventions that were under secrecy orders at the end of Fiscal Year 2010, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office told Secrecy News last week. It’s a 1% rise over the year before, and the highest total in more than a decade.”

“Under the Invention Secrecy Act of 1951, patent applications on new inventions can be subject to secrecy orders restricting their publication if government agencies believe that disclosure would be ‘detrimental to the national security’.”

“The current list of technology areas that is used to screen patent applications for possible restriction under the Invention Secrecy Act is not publicly available and has been denied under the Freedom of Information Act. (An appeal is pending.)…”

“Most of the listed technology areas are closely related to military applications. But some of them range more widely.”